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August 13, 2017

August 13, 2017

What we say is as important as what we do not say. In the years leading up to World War 2, Nazism gained strength because people did not question the targeted, racist propaganda of leadership or speak up on behalf of their fellow citizens of different religious backgrounds, skin color and sexual orientation when they were under attack. As a Jewish American, the thought that there is a conversation to be had with my daughter about white people marching with Nazi flags on behalf of beliefs of separation and hatred pains me, and the lack of clear condemnation of the Neo-Nazi, Alt Right acts of terror in Charlottesville from our President and other top US leaders is appalling. Yet it is not solely about them. Remaining silent or pointing a finger at a lack of reaction do not change make. The long history of discrimination and racism in our country should be dissipating, not flourishing, but change requires active participation by those privileged enough to be safe to have this conversation. Being an advocate and voice for all who are under subtle or outward attack in our system is of increasing importance. So, yes, march and outcry, but also pay heed to the need for kindness, awareness, sensitivity and a willingness to speak up around the small ways we allow intolerance and hatred to fester. Silence and tolerance of the small acts of discrimination observed daily can have a deleterious effect. Ask someone why they feel a discriminatory joke is ok. Be an advocate for those in need. Speak to your children about privilege and advocacy. Use your voice. Vote. Silence is golden in many scenarios, but not now. #charlottesville

August 15, 2017

August 15, 2017

August 10, 2017

August 10, 2017